Encouraging, equipping, and empowering Scotland's corporate sector

Thrive 2019 conference highlights

thrive ;

verb, thrived or throve, thriven, thriving.

to prosper; be fortunate or successful.

to grow or develop vigorously; flourish

Our Mission


The roots of Thrive Scotland go back to the creation of The Business Connection charity in 2014 through the partnership of four Christian businessmen working in Aberdeen who wanted to strengthen relationships and foster a sense of community during very challenging industry downturns

We encourage people of faith, or none, to gather and connect and provide a safe place where people can be encouraged, equipped and empowered to endure the stresses of professional business life. Our events are run by business people, for business people. We offer a welcoming, safe place in the space between the office, family and church. Find practical advice to inspire, stimulating debate to refresh and a trained ear to listen


Going forward Thrive’s focus areas are:


1. To establish workplace city-wide communities where people from different sectors come together for breakfast, lunch or evening seminars on relevant topics

2. Build deep relationships with Christians in the workplace to encourage and support the creation & development of Christian Workplace Groups across Scottish companies


3. Develop strong connections with Pastors and church leaders across the city to:

- leverage partner organisations e.g., London Institute for Contemporary Christianity (LICC) to provide teaching resources for churches and groups


- encourage workplace ambassadors within the church family to champion the ministry

As we "seek the welfare of our cities" we would love you to join us and be part of the movement.

Please follow us on our social media profiles to keep up with

what is happening in the world of Thrive Scotland

Our history

Since 2014 we have encouraged people of faith, or none, to gather and connect from the busyness and stress of their daily work. The trustees established a regular rhythm of fortnightly breakfasts and monthly talks over many years and have seen this network grow to over 550 people on the mailing list and, pre-Covid, a smaller, more dedicated, group of around 30-40 coming regularly to events.


In 2019 in Aberdeen, we ran the inaugural Thrive Conference to encourage and equip Christians in the marketplace, followed in 2020 by an online conference when we engaged with more than 2500 individuals.


Events

Along with our parters LICC and The Navigators we ran 'ReWork', a one-day event aiming to inspire young adults in their first decade of work to connect their discipleship to what they do, and to see how they can thrive in their jobs as God intended – making a difference with him through what they do, not just around it.

In combination with inspiring content from the front, ReWork connects young adults with experienced Christian mentors from matching sectors. Time with mentors to process and apply the learning from the front gives ReWork a dynamic edge.

Our first ReWork was on Saturday 19 November 2022 Grassmarket Community Project, Edinburgh. We plan to run more ReWork events across Scotland in 2023.

Please click below to keep up to date re our events.

News

Check out our latest thoughts on balancing the pressures of work, family and church life...

The Reality of Work-Life Imbalance- Part 2: The Strain

Faith and Work
September 02, 20226 min read

“ Perhaps you have heard someone say “Where are the men who (in my day) would do a hard day’s work and then be out at the prayer meeting? Men are not just committed enough these days.”” - Martyn Link

The Reality of Work-Life Imbalance- Part 2: The Strain

Worklife

For too long the church has viewed the workplace as the space between the church service and the midweek prayer meeting. There may be the occasional sermon or book on the theology of work, and how it pleases God for us to work hard and fair and to do your bit for your family and society. However, this approach misses the subtlety of the changes that have occurred over the last two decades in the modern workplace. Too many Pastors have only a distant memory of what secular work was like and little understanding of the complexities of the modern workplace.

No longer do we have one job for life, no longer do we leave our responsibilities in the office when he head out the door, no longer do we live our lives working our whole lives at the local factory or office just around the corner. No longer do we mix with our work colleagues socially at the weekend and get to know their kids. Maybe it never quite reached this nirvana (particularly as the social benefits were often outweighed by financial struggles) but work has undergone a seismic shift in both nature and pace.

The modern workplace is transient, distant (both emotionally and often physically) and all embracing. The modern worker will move jobs every couple of years. They may have to re-locate their home numerous times, unless they live in a large city hub. Modern communications means they are contactable 24 hours a day, 7 days a week, even during weekends and holidays. Responsiveness to emails is a pre-requisite for success as important as punctuality to formal meetings. Add into the mix the increasingly global nature of business and, working for an international company can mean frequent long haul travel. Put it all together and you have long hours, frequent out of hours interruptions, pressure, stress and exhaustion.

All of this inevitably leads to pressure on those closet to us:  our wives and our kids. Work puts a strain on families; it can disintegrate friendships and cause health problems. Marriages fall apart, families are fractured, homes are split. And the church looks around and wonders where all the committed men are? Perhaps you have heard someone say “Where are the men who (in my day) would do a hard day’s work and then be out at the prayer meeting? Men are not just committed enough these days.”

Dear church, newsflash for you – we are fighting to survive, we are straining under phenomenal demands from our work and the consequences of a broken, splinted society. We are putting our limited energy into protecting those that are most precious to us and God – our spouses and our kids. We recognise that we don’t have a perfect work / life balance, in fact, we struggle, and fight to minimise the imbalance. This is the reality that we live with.

I recognise that not everyone in the workplace has such demands on them, or to such an extent. My argument is that the church should take the time  to understand where people are at and not treat everyone in the workplace as a homogeneous group, dispensing generic advice to all and having the same expectations of all. In my first post on this subject I split the workplace into four categories that are generalisations of the various types of demands work places on them and the rewards it gives (read Part 1 here). In this post I’m speaking as someone in the top right hand box of that quadrant. I admit that these are generalities and sterotypes to some extent, but by their very nature models are simplifications of reality. Good models help us understand reality better.

My point is that we need to stop measuring someone’s commitment to God by their attendance, or lack of it, at church meetings. For those that have been put in a position of responsibility and pressure – our modern day Daniel’s and Joseph’s, we need to stop asking, why aren’t they here at our meetings, and start asking, what is God doing through them there? It’s interesting that we never read of Joseph or Daniel undertaking any activity at the local Egyptian or Babylonian synagogue. Their entire ministry was played out in front of the most senior secular leaders of their day…and what an impact those two men had.

In the providence of God Joseph saved an entire continent from starvation, Daniel stood true to Jehovah in the heart of the most powerful nation on earth. His testimony brought the most powerful kings of his day face to face with the living God, causing two pagan kings to proclaim the power and majesty of the only living God (King Nebuchadnezzar in Daniel 4.34 & 35 and King Darius in Daniel 5.26 & 27).

And so, why do we do it? Why not give it all up and get an easier job, a less stressful life? There are many reasons, but the one I want to mention is one that I have come to realise over the last few months. It starts with a question: which of the four quadrants (see Part 1) is hardest to reach with the truth of the gospel? Both “Sweet Spot” and “Passing Time” have jobs with low demands and are looking for things outside of work to give them meaning. They are more likely to be open to forming new friendships and attending evangelistic courses. Those in “Slave Labour” are more likely to be desperate for something meaningful in their life. Getting time with them may be a challenge, but there is likely to be some interest there, if they are not too disillusioned with life. The real tough ones to reach are those in “Labour of Love” – they have extremely demanding lives and very rewarding work. The only way to reach this group is to run as fast, as hard, for as long as they do. They are not looking to form friendships through clubs, they do not have a wide circle of friends. Often their work is their life.

So, if God puts you in that top right hand quadrant and you start to build relationships with people that very few people are able to meet even as acquaintances, you feel incredibly honoured. As you see God working in their lives, you start to think that maybe you should stick around. You start to see your work life imbalance as less an admission of failure, but rather as a ticket of entry. Entry into the lives of a quadrant that the church will never reach through standard evangelistic techniques and methods. It almost feels like you are undercover! Except you are hiding nothing. But you are there on your own, no support team, no backup plan. The church may not understand or affirm your calling, but you know deep inside that God has his hand on your life and those around you.

Be blessed all you Josephs out there…you know who you are!

Martyn Link

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The Business Connection, Scottish Charity no. SC045163 is the parent charity of Thrive Scotland

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